The Epic EPIC Fail that is Facebook Pages – Marketing Mondays

December 10, 2012 Marketing, self-publishing 2

I don’t know about you, but I’ve had to work around using Facebook to market these days due to the Pay to Play nature of the business.  It’s like Chicago-style politics came to social marketing, and I’ll tell you what – I’m not interested.

I get it, if you’re Pepsi or Coke or any other billion dollar corporation, this whole deal is just par for the course.  You pay for advertising all the time.  I pay, sometimes.  But if I can find a way to get the word out without paying, of course I like that better.

But this whole thing with Facebook goes beyond that for me.  It’s beyond dirty what they did.  I admit I don’t use it a whole lot – not even the page for my non-fiction business.  But when I did use it, I got results when I ran a clever campaign.  Let’s look at some of those now, shall we?

Every year Simple Schooling runs two major promotions (three if you include Black Friday and Cyber Monday, but I’m not – because those are simply sales, not promotions where I give a whole bunch of stuff away for free).

The first one is in May and that’s a week-long open house.  People get to try out the courses and I give free stuff along the way.  I normally do two things to promote open house:

  • I do an email blast – typically one on the first day, maybe one in the middle of the week, and one on the last day.
  • I do a Facebook blast – ditto for this.  Three or four for a week long promotion.

Here are my results from May 2012 for Facebook:

Photobucket

It’s pretty boring, isn’t it?  I didn’t even put up an image, yet Facebook says that 2,555 people saw this post.  Here’s the second day:

Photobucket

Still pretty good.  It’s normal for people to start to tune you out after the first blast.  They saw it yesterday, they might look at it in the stream, but they don’t need to click or anything.  You’re going for those who missed the day before.

Here’s the final day of open house – I didn’t even mention open house or anything – just a quick post about a freebie I have for the Fourth of July.  (Which has been free for like three years…)

Photobucket

Getting more than 1500 people to take a look at this last day post is impressive, in my opinion.  People have been hearing about it for a week now, so this was a win as far as I was concerned.

Then, on a whim to try and keep some momentum going (normally I ignore the FB page) I posted this little Mark Twain quote for Memorial Day…

Photobucket

Now look, this post says nothing but I still had more than 1100 people take a look at it.  Just a dumb little “have a nice weekend” post.

All this looks pretty good for a little piddly company like Simple Schooling.  I think I had about 2500-2700 followers at this time.  (I have 2900 right now.)  So that first day of Open house really got great results – almost everyone saw the post.  Maybe they didn’t all click or interact, but at least the people who liked my page saw what they signed up for.

Now let’s flash-forward to December 2012.  This campaign is currently going on, actually.  I’m doing The Twelve Days of Freebies, which is something I do every year.  It would be great to compare how effective FB was in last year’s campaign, but I don’t know how many followers I had last Christmas.  It wasn’t a lot, I think I pushed over the 1000 mark in October 2011.  So by Christmas it was maybe 1100.  Growth was slow until this year.

So considering I have almost 3000 people who decided they “like” Simple Schooling, on the First Day of Freebies I had these results:

Photobucket

One thousand people.  Out of 2950.  Saw my post.  One third.  Back in May, before the Pay to Play tactics, I had almost 100%, remember?

WTF?  That’s what I started asking.

But wait, it gets better – remember that on day two of open house I still had 1900 people see the post.  Just watch my opinion of Facebook go down the drain with the number of people who are “allowed” to see my post, according to the new Facebook Rules:

Photobucket

EIGHT-FIVE comments on this one, girls and boys.  EIGHTY-FIVE.  Surely this would be considered a “popular” post, right?  Nope – even though I have almost 3000 people who like my page, only 20% of them are “allowed” to see my post.

Photobucket

And by day seven, we’re down to 10%.  This was a Friday, BTW.  The same day of the week that I sent out that stupid “Happy Memorial Day Mark Twain” post that got 1100 pairs of eyeballs last May.
Photobucket

This is what has become of Facebook.  I have, essentially, lost all faith in them.  I will NEVER Pay to Play (and I have tried, but both times Facebook told me I was not even allowed to pay for more eyeballs.  Not. Even. Allowed.)

I could care less about Facebook these days, I’m not wasting another second on it after this post.  I have an e-mail list with double the number of people on it.  I have a Twitter account that is growing every day (hell, that SS twitter account has 6000+ followers, too).

I have blogs, like this one.  I have other ways to get the word out and Facebook can go to hell.  This is what they’ve done to small businesses all over the freaking world.  Cut us down because they lied to stock-holders about the worth of this company and then lost all kinds of money when they went public.

I’m not an anti-corporation person, and I definitely aspire to be a fat cat rich person, so I’m not against making money either.  But what Facebook did to its users is DIRTY.

And I’m done.

And if Twitter tries this shit, I’m done there too.  I pay for Constant Contact, so I can’t see them trying to extort money out of me, but if they do try, I’m out there as well.

So my best advice on how best to use Facebook for marketing your book is don’t bother.  Build an e-mail list, build a Twitter account.  Join chat forums in your genre.  But whatever you do, don’t rely on Facebook.  Because you can spend a few years building up your fan base on FB and they can take them all away from you.

Just.

Like.

That.

Until next week…

Julie